Air Quality, Health, and Urban Planning

11/9/2017

Despite several decades of progress, outdoor air pollution in the Pittsburgh area remains a significant public health burden. An increasing variety of health threats are being identified at concentrations previously considered safe, significantly expanding the proportion of population at risk.

At the same time, substantial activities are underway to make Pittsburgh more sustainable, economically vibrant, and socially just. By and large, these actions can take place in concert with goals to improve the region's air quality. The following documents outline general planning guidance focused on such an alignment. Specific attention is also placed on 1) the intersections among public health, architecture, and air quality and 2) the health benefits of green space development. These documents were prepared by ROCIS team member Norman Anderson, MSPH, Environment Public Health Consultant to the Heinz Endowments. Mr. Anderson collaborated with architects Sander Schuur, Linda Schuur, and Rik Ekstrom on the summary of the Stockholm-NYC conversation.

Comments and suggestions for improvement will be greatly appreciated:
Norman Anderson
andersonenvironmentalhealth @ gmail .com


 


Other work by Norm Anderson:

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